Intracranial pressure elevation alters CSF clearance pathways

Our preprint on Intracranial pressure elevation alters CSF clearance pathways is now out on bioRxiv! 

Infusion testing is a common procedure to determine whether shunting will be beneficial in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus. The method has a well-developed theoretical foundation and corresponding mathematical models that describe the CSF circulation from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. Here, we investigate to what extent the proposed glymphatic or paravascular pathway (or similar pathways) modifies the results of the traditional mathematical models.

We used a two-compartment model consisting of the subarachnoid space and the paravascular spaces. For the arachnoid granulations, the cribriform plate, capillaries and paravascular spaces, resistances were calculated and used to estimate flow before and during an infusion test. Next, pressure in the subarachnoid space and paravascular spaces were computed. Finally, different variations to the model were tested to evaluate the sensitivity of selected parameters.

At baseline, we found a very small paravascular flow directed into the subarachnoid space, while 60% of the fluid left through the arachnoid granulations and 40% left through the cribriform plate. However, during the infusion, paravascular flow reversed and 25% of the fluid left through these spaces, while 60% went through the arachnoid granulations and only 15% through the cribriform plate.

The relative distribution of CSF flow to different clearance pathways depends on intracranial pressure (ICP), with the arachnoid granulations as the main contributor to outflow. As such, ICP increase is an important factor that should be addressed when determining the pathways of injected substances in the subarachnoid space.